Exclusive: AMD’s Ryzen 7 3750H Mobility Flagship Will Hit The Shelves In April

Exclusive: AMD’s Ryzen 7 3750H Mobility Flagship Will Hit The Shelves In April

Exclusive: AMD’s Ryzen 7 3750H Mobility Flagship Will Hit The Shelves In April

This is the last of my mobility leaks spree (here is part 1 and part 2) that I have been posting the past couple of days. It turns out that AMD’s Ryzen 3000 mobility series (this is 12nm and not to be confused with the 7nm parts) will actually be landing much sooner than expected. I have been told that we can expect it to be stocked as early as early April (I am actually hearing 1st April) – almost a full month before the Core i7-9750H (and family) will launch.

AMD’s 3000 Series 12nm Mobility Processors Including Flagship Ryzen 7 3750H Landing In April, Will Be Coupled With NVIDIA’s Turing GPUs
This is pretty impressive news because it means that AMD is beating Intel to market in the mobility space by at least a month (last I heard, the sales embargo is scheduled to lift sometime in May and probably later rather than sooner). AMD is giving non-MSI manufacturers the ability to pair NVIDIA’s Turing GPUs with its Ryzen 12nm processors and since the overall cost of the package is lower (Ryzen CPUs are cheaper than their Intel counterparts), this means manufacturers can reduce the overall MSRP of their gaming laptops – something I have already talked about before.

My source tells me that all of the major OEMs like Acer, ASUS, and HP expect SKUs to be available by early April, in major brands like: Acer Nitro, ASUS TUF and HP Pavilion and/or OMEN. AMD’s mobility parts will represent the company’s ongoing foray into capturing as much of the mobility market as possible (a market in which AMD was completely uncompetitive as of a couple years ago) and the Ryzen 3000 mobility series might allow it to do just that.

As far as I know, Intel’s processor parts will still beat AMD’s as far as actual compute performance goes, but this is a fact that might not matter at all in gaming laptops. The reason for that is that in gaming laptops, the CPU is very rarely the point at which you can throw dollars to radically increase gaming performance – its the GPU. The fact that AMD processors lose out to Intel in compute will make very little difference if manufacturers can use the flexibility accorded to them by Ryzen’s cheaper cost and fit in a much beefier GPU – which I’m told is exactly what they’re planning to do.

We are looking at both the GTX 1660 Ti and RTX 2060 on offer with the flagship Ryzen 3750H from major OEMs and the cost of a 1660 Ti/Ryzen combo (albeit probably with a lower tier processor than the 3750H) will be as low as $1099! This is a brand new pricing tier considering the state of the market right now and things are about to heat up as far as the Intel vs AMD war goes. This is all for now.

source: wccftech.com

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